Adjective Agreement Rule

Adjective Agreement Rule

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The noun-adjective agreement is one of the most fundamental aspects of Spanish grammar: adjectives must correspond to the nouns on which they refer both in number and sex. It is possible to make the masculine adjective feminine by adding -A at the end if the words end in a consonance, but not in all cases, for example “Trabajador / Trabajadora” (good) and “Popular / Populara” (false). Most nationalities also change their gender, including some that end with consonants like “español->española”. Now look at this unusual summary table of Spanish adjectives! one. For two or more nouns, the adjective is regularly plural, but often corresponds to the next (especially if attributive). On the other hand, to describe feminine nouns like CASA (house), we must use a feminine adjective like BONITA (pretty) or ESPACIOSA (spacious), and not a bonito or espacioso. However, spanish feminine adjectives are the same words with a slight change at the end from -O to -A, z.B. “Bueno” to “Buena”. As its name suggests, descriptive adjectives of a certain quality of a noun. In some situations, there are also similarities between names and their identifiers and their modifiers. This is common in languages like French and Spanish, where articles, determinants and adjectives (both attributive and predictive) correspond to the nouns they qualify: here are some special cases for subject-verb correspondence in English: in Scandinavian languages, adjectives (attributive and predictive) are based on gender, number and determination of the subject, that they modify, that they have refused.

In Icelandic and faroe islands, unlike other Scandinavian languages, adjectives are also rejected in the grammatical case. In substantive sentences, adjectives do not correspond to the noun, although pronouns do. A szép könyveitekkel “with your beautiful books” (“szép”: beautiful): The suffixes of the plural, possessive “you” and casus marking “with” are marked only on the noun. In Hungarian, verbs are polypersonal, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its (precise) object. There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, he or she specifically)….